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EMERGENCIES ONLY! Please state your emergency with every details possible and somebody will assist you as soon as possible.


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  #1  
Old 04-08-2008, 10:53 PM
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kathie6 kathie6 is offline
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Default Baby Kitten.

i found a baby kitten two weeks ago and she was literally a baby, she couldn't have been more than ten days old when i found her.

well, i'm completely in love with her and when i slept over a friend's house, i brought her with me (i had her for a week then) but i accidentally left the formula at her house. i hadn't fed the kitten in five hours and all the pet supermarkets were closed so i had no other choice but to give her regular cow milk. i was hesitating as i did it but i didn't want her to starve...

BIG MISTAKE.

she woke me up the next morning crying and had diarrhea. she did poop three times and on the third time, as i was cleaning her booty, she bled. VERY little. maybe a drop. but it freaked me out.

i never fed her cow's milk after that time; i immediately fed her formula and still do. that same day, she wouldn't cry, she seemed weak and she sneezed a lot. her eyes also grew a little puffy.

since then she has gotten better. she cries just like she used to and when i leave her to walk, she reacts to the sound of my voice and comes running towards me.

my only concern is that she bled after her bowel movement today, despite the fact that it's been exactly a week since the first time it happened. the difference is that she bled a lot more. i haven't changed her diet what-so-ever so i have no idea why this is happening. also, her eyes relaese a little bit of what looks like brown discharge. maybe not gross discharge but the best way that i can describe it is that it looks like "eye boogers".

the last thing i want is for her to die and i would really appreciate it if someone could tell me what i can do.

please and thank you :]

Last edited by kathie6 : 04-08-2008 at 10:55 PM.
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  #2  
Old 04-08-2008, 11:13 PM
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MissDolittle MissDolittle is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

Hi Kathy and welcome .

Sorry to hear you are learning the hard way that even nothing is better than cow's milk..or plain water will do too next time. Now don't beat yourself up though, it won't change anything.

I can't tell you why there's blood in the stool, but I can tell you that I had tons of kittens that had a little bit of blood in the stool the first 4 weeks or so, and then it just disappeared and they were ok.

Does she still have diarrhea? Any other symptoms than the eye discharge? Which is nothing big to worry about either, unless the eyes get really red and infected, I would just clean the eyes with some warm water on a cotton ball or so.
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Old 04-09-2008, 04:14 PM
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

well, the diarrhea is gone. her eyes always seem to be a little dirty but they're never red or anything. the puffy-ness is gone though. she still sneezes a little...

i was hoping it wasn't anything serious..
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Old 04-09-2008, 08:39 PM
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Kirial Kirial is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

In the case that formula is forgotten, I keep this list posted on my fridge. Mostly because I often have to read it off over the phone when people call with "I found a baby kitty, help!" It uses ingrediants that can be found at most grocery stores or all-night walmarts (I'm the best customer they have from 11pm-4am, usually the only)


Quote:
In a pinch, human baby formula can be used if made up to double the normal strength (human baby formula is normally not nutritious enough for kittens). As with the below formulas, please remember that any emergency formula should only be used until regular Feline Replacement Formula (such as KMR or Just Born) can be purchased at the pet store. None of these are nutritionally complete for the long term health of a kitten.

Formula #1
1 quart whole goat's milk
1 teaspoon light Karo syrup
1 tablespoon nonfat plain yogurt (goat's milk preferred)
1 egg yolk
Knox unflavored gelatin:
Newborn-1 week 1 pkg
2nd week 1 1/2 - 2 pkgs
3rd week 2 1/2 - 3 pkgs
4th week 4 pkgs

Put goat's milk in saucepan, add gelatin in the amount above depending on the kitten's age. Heat goat's milk/gelatin mixture just until gelatin is dissolved. Remove from heat. Mix in remaining ingredients and refrigerate. It will keep up to one week. Heat to skin test temperature and feed kittens.

Formula #2
8 ounces homogenized whole milk
2 egg yolks
1 teaspoon salad oil
1 drop liquid pediatric vitamins (optional)

Mix well and warm before using. Keep refrigerated.

Formula #3
1 part boiled water to 5 parts evaporated milk
1/2 teaspoon bone meal per 16 oz fluid

Mix well, refrigerate, warm before using .

Formula #4
1 can Evaporated Milk
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons Karo syrup

All three mixed well and kept in tightly sealed jar in fridge.
At feeding time mix 1/2 of the estimated feeding amount with:
Equal amount of boiling water
(once a day mix 1 drop of human infant liquid vitamins in each kitties formula)

If constipation occurrs: add 1 drop of vegetable oil to each kitties formula no more than once daily till problem is eased. Test temperature before feeding (the combination of boiling water and chilled formula should be just about right).



And then of course, to help with the bleeding concern:

At one point or another, a tiny amount of bleeding has occured in nearly every kitten I have ever raised. (And that is a lot of kittens btw) One of the most common causes is: Bad food gave kitty diarrhea- should only happen the first or second time that it 'goes' and then should clear up. Usually no cause for concern, but consulting a vet is never a bad idea.

Another common one is when they are first starting to eat dry food. If they begin to eat it early as some of mine have, they cant chew it properly and if it doesnt dissolve enough in their stomache then occasionally it can scratch their intestines. As it is the dirtiest place in the body, this can cause illness, infections and fever. A tiny bit of Amoxy will help keep infection under control, but consult your vet.

And finally: Another really common cause of bleeding in both kittens and adult cats, is Worms. Any kitten that you "find" should be wormed ASAP. We have no idea as adoptive parents if that baby's momma was a clean, pristine housepet that did 50 shows a year, or a three legged old gal with only one ear that ate out of the dumpster to feed her babies. Consult your vet to establish an accurate age and when is the soonest you can worm the baby. Your vet may also want a stool sample to establish for sure baby has the bugs. I live in the country, so here, we give them the medicine anyway Prevention now is better than Treatment later.

My Zeroun is prone to worms, and very very prone to bloody diarrhea (seems to think he'll die of thirst if he doesnt drink 10 gallons of water a day) and often the drops of blood were present before the worms were a notable size. Just because you cant see them doesnt mean they arnt there. Roundworms are tricky like that. Also, if your new baby is possitive for worms you will want to get any other animals you own treated as well. Even if the kitty didnt even see them, you do, and it could have transfered.



The best way to judge the health of an animal is in their eyes and their poop. If the eyes are bright, attentive, and follow your movements with ease, kitty is usually alright. Poo on the other hand, comes with a myriad of colours, consistancies, and warning signs. This chart sorts it out pretty well.

Quote:
Guide to the Rainbow of Poop
and Urine Colors (The Scoop on Poop):

Urine Color:


Red/Dark Orange - Severe sign. Severe at-risk, must be seen immediately.

Dark yellow/almost brown - Extreme dehydration or bilirubin in urine. Either way it’s BAD! Needs immediate aggressive treatment.

Intense yellow - Concentrated urine. Animal is not getting enough fluid for total body hydration. Needs immediate care.

Yellow - Mildly concentrated urine. Monitor closely and if ANY other signs, seek care immediately.

Light yellow - Mildly dilute urine. Overall body hydration should be adequate if no kidney disease. With sick/injured or at-risk animals, this is the color we shoot for.

Pale yellow - Dilute urine. Hydration should be excellent if no kidney disease. With any significantly debilitated or severe risk animal, this is the color we shoot for. Be aware however of possible over-hydration and keep urine this color, only if under medical care.

Almost clear - Severely dilute urine. Risk of over-hydration. Urine should only be this dilute if under constant medical supervision.


Fecal Color:


Bloody - Actual red blood seen in stool. Could indicate panleukepenia. Grossly abnormal, must be seen ASAP.

Mucous - yellowish/white/clear slimy substance. Indicates severe bowel irritation. Grossly abnormal and needs immediate care.

Black - True dark black color to stool. Usually indicates bleeding high in the bowel. Severe sign, needs immediate attention.

Brown - Normal color. Be happy!

Orange - Usually indicates way too much bile in stool, can occur with reflux.Seek medical advice.

Yellow - Almost always indicates bacterial imbalance in the bowel. If has diarrhea also, usually related to coccidia. Seek medical advice.

White - Grossly abnormal color, usually indicates, severe bacterial imbalance and severe infection in the bowel. Kitten at risk of dying, needs medical attention, ASAP.


Consistency:


Dry/hard - Abnormal, usually indicates dehydration. Seek care, promptly.

Firm - Normal, be happy.

Formed but soft - Low range of ‘normal’. If stools change from firm to soft you should seek medical advice.

Toothpaste - Still has somewhat tubular form but falls apart once touched. Abnormal, needs medication.

Cow-patty - Never formed but thick enough it falls into a ‘cow-patty’ shape. Abnormal, animal is at significant risk and needs immediate attention.

Liquidy - Just fluid that falls out of rectum, thin and may have mucous. Abnormal, animal is at severe risk and must be seen immediately.

The ‘Squirts’ - Animal has no control over bowel and watery fluid squirts out of rectum. Grossly abnormal, animal in danger of dying, must be seen immediately!


Those are all the things I can think of for now. If I think of more I'll be sure to post them. I hope this is helpful!
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  #5  
Old 04-09-2008, 10:23 PM
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salt&pepper´smommy salt&pepper´smommy is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

salt and pepper went almost trough the same, and it turned up to be coccidia, a week of antibiotic help them, and I got them dewormed as soon as they could take it. Diet changes tend to show those kind of problems
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:47 PM
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kathie6 kathie6 is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

ugh, this involves a vet...

don't vets typically cost an arm and a leg?
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Old 04-09-2008, 11:08 PM
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MissDolittle MissDolittle is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

Thanks Kirial!!! Awesome info!!!

Kathie6, my vet gives me infant amoxicillin for my cats. Do you know somebody with a baby or have one yourself by any chance? Have them check their medical cabinets. I know it's a long shot, but better than nothing.
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Old 04-10-2008, 12:47 AM
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Kirial Kirial is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

I dunno if my vet is just really really affordable, but I have been able to pay for all kinds of silly little things that come up without having to sell off a kidney or anything, and believe me, money is tight at my house.

When I go to the vet my fee is usually $15. That's a 9 dollar consult and a 6 dollar bottle of antibiotics. Of course, I usually just go in to get the antibotics and have whatever injured Fluffy checked out while there to be on the safe side. I think the highest bill I ever had was when I took him six feral cats from the salebarn ($200) Although, the last shelter I volunteered at, they almost fell out of their chairs when I mentioned that.

Is vet care unusually low in my area?

Anywho, amoxicillin is the proverbial "cure-all" at my house. As long as you have animals or children it never hurts to have some. I have a couple bottles in the fridge at most times, and during the spring especially I keep a half dozen un-mixed bottles in the cabinet for emergencies or when Roo's herpes flares up. Spring really is when all life starts back up again, and that includes the germs and bugs that get to our furry friends.
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Old 04-11-2008, 03:54 PM
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kathie6 kathie6 is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

so much, her progress hasn't been so bad.
her eyes are way better and there's barely any of that brown stuff.
she did bleed when she did number two yesterday. a lot actually. i watched her and i realized that she bleeds AFTER she's pooped.
before yesterday, she hadn't bled since my very first post.
i looked at the chart Kirial sent me (thanks!) and everything seems normal, except the consistancy isn't firm. it's a little softer. I think.

i called my local vet the day she first bled and the receptionist said that the fee for a regular visit is usually $27.50. it seemed pretty reasonable. but then she said that the price can change depending on what needs to be done, blah blah.

not to mention, my situation with the kitten is that my parents don't really approve of me keeping it. they've allowed me to keep it until it's old enough to be put up for adoption or something but i have a feeling they just might let me keep it. although they don't admit it, they've become just as attached to bella (that's her name) as i have.

so far, they've been pretty understanding about buying the formula and a new bottle (my mom even bought adult cat food. evidence that she secretely adores her too) but i don't know if they'd let me take her to a vet since that's a little more pricey.

about the amoxicillin, i'm pretty sure we have some but my question is, what effect will that have on her? is that going to cure the bleeding? if so, how much do i give her?

another thing, i figured it's pretty normal for her to be crying most of the time since she's a baby right? she only cries when i leave her on the floor to walk or when she wakes up (most likely cause she hungry). she's also been biting a lot lately. she used to suck on my fingers during the first and second week but once i found out that it becomes a bad habit i try to tell her "no" everytime she does it and i move my hand away. but now, she doesn't even try to suck. she mostly bites. and it's not just my fingers but it's everything she can put in her mouth like my arm or the edge of my shirt collar.

this is normal...right?
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:42 PM
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Kirial Kirial is offline
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Default Re: Baby Kitten.

When Zeroun has worms his blood is "on the stool" not "in the stool" usually just a drop or two on the top of the pile. He wont go if I am watching (had to put up a kitty curtain or he uses a plant instead) so that is the best way I can describe it.

Some vets actually (in coordination with local shelters) have programs to assist with medical care for wowzers or foster cases. There is sometimes a waiting list or application program, and depending on the case you may be asked to forfeit the animal (mostly in cases that the ownder cant afford the animal's basic care.) You would have to ask the shelters nearby about this.

(in case you are wondering, "Wowzers" are those sudden things that come up without warning and are reeeally pricey, but are usually one-time, like Rabis Boosters, severe breaks and disfigurements like amputation, or spay/nueters though they don't cost as much)

Similarly, sometimes there are independent groups that help good-will cases such as yours, but again you would have to apply for the assistance. I began one of these in my area, mostly because around my parts if it costs to much you just take Fido out back and "put him down" country style.



As far as amoxy goes... the dosage depends on the brand. Certain kinds are more concentrated than others, but if you can tell me the brand and manufacturer, I can most likely help you work out a dosage. For example, I use Amoxy-Drop by Pfizer. I like it because it is a powder form that you mix with 12ml of water when you need it. Handy, because the powder lasts a year, but the liquid form has a shelf life of 14 days.

In my particular medicine, when reconstituted there is 50mg of medicine in every 1ml of liquid. Average Cats get 50mgs (5-10mg/lb) once a day for a week, while dogs get 5mg/lb twice a day for a week. It is important to know the concentration because the dropper that comes with most bottles measures mls of liquid, and not the mgs each animal needs.

When it comes to behavior, the crying and biting is very normal and a good sign. As kittens get older they tend to become more aggressive feeders, not only biting on mom, but head-butting her tummy and pushing siblings away. It's a survival techinque more than anything, but it shows your baby still has a healthy appetite.

The crying is also a good sign, showing healthy lungs and that she associates you with "Mother". Kittens actually begin crying and fussing any time they percieve themselves to be alone, not because they are hungry or lonely, but because they want to know where momma or litter mates are. especially important before the eyes open. As kittens get older, momma cats tend to ignore the crying. By three weeks when they are fumbling around and trying walking, the mother is often an Ace Ignorer. This is an important behavior, teaching the kittens independence, so running to her every time she fusses now can cause problems later.
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